ShoutOUT! : Watch 5 local feature films including this year's Singapore Oscar Entry



Here is your chance to catch Singapore's entry to the 2015 Oscars in the Foreign Language Category 'Sayang Disayang'. For the 3rd year running, Objectifs will host free rooftop screenings as part of the Singapore Film Commission’s WATCH LOCAL campaign. From 4 to 8 November 2014, film buffs can enjoy a series of 5 Singapore feature films and a DVD Launch at the open-air rooftop garden at Objectifs. 

The films include Sanif Olek’s 'Sayang Disayang', Colin Goh and Woo Yen Yen's 'Singapore Dreaming' and Wong Chen Hsi's 'Innocents' among others.

Where: Objectifs Rooftop, 56A Arab Street 
When: 4 to 8 Nov 2014, 8pm 
Screenings are free but pre-registration by email to info@objectifs.com.sg is required. 


SCHEDULE

4 Nov, Tue
DVD launch of Innocents (dir. Wong Chen-Hsi), DVD signing and filmmaker talk, followed by screening* 

5 Nov, Wed 
Kidnapper (dir. Kelvin Tong) 

6 Nov, Thur 
Sayang Disayang (dir. Sanif Olek)

7 Nov, Fri 
Mad About English (dir. Lian Pek) 

8 Nov, Sat 
Singapore Dreaming (dir. Colin Goh and Woo Yen Yen)

*The programme on 4 Nov starts at 730pm. All other screenings from 5 to 8 Nov start at 8pm.

Watch Local is an initiative by the Singapore Film Commission and industry to drive local appreciation and support of Singapore films. Screenings in the last 2 years at Objectifs saw full houses every night, so register early to avoid disappointment!

Synopses of films

Innocents, 88 min
In the monsoon season of 1980s Singapore, Syafiqah enters a harsh and unsympathetic institution, where she befriends an ostracised boy. Misunderstood and bullied, they while away their afternoons in the giant storm drains behind their school, carving out a fragile world of fantasy and freedom. But as the rains intensify, a vow of secrecy forces her to embark on a quest of independence well beyond her years.
In this gentle and delicate coming of age story, Chen-Hsi Wong's sensitive imagery and honest performances critically investigate horrifying memories of childhood within the paternal landscape of a swiftly evolving city-state.

Kidnapper, 98 min

Lim, a struggling and obnoxious 40-year-old taxi-driver, is a complete failure. His wife left him years ago. And his only son – Wei Siang – is frequently neglected. Mistaken for a rich man’s son, Wei Siang is kidnapped at a shopping mall one day and held for an enormous ransom. Thus begins one father’s relentless quest to get his son back.

Sayang Disayang, 70 min
Murni is the live-in nurse who works for Pak Harun, a lonely and bitter retired widower. Murni is in a dilemma – to cook a Sambal Goreng dish that is exactly like the one cooked by Park Harun’s late wife, but success seems to elude her. Despite this, Murni loves to sing in the kitchen, irritating Pak Harun further. What is the elusive ingredient that would diffuse the tension between Murni and Pak Harun, to resolve their discord in perfect harmony and remedy their fractured lives?

Mad About English, 82 min 
Have you ever seen 10,000 students learning English from one teacher – all at the same time? Met a detective whose ‘mission impossible’ is to arrest bad grammar? Seen a 74-year old retiree who thinks nothing of ambushing foreigners on the street so that he can practice his English? Or heard a Chinese policeman speak with a New York Bronx accent?
Catch Mad About English! A hilarious and heartwarming film about the people of China and their rush to learn English for the hosting of the 2008 Olympics.

Singapore Dreaming, 105 min
Disappointed by his failed dreams, Loh Poh Huat visits his frustrations on his family. So when he wins the lottery, everyone believes the money will deliver them from their struggles. However, Loh dies abruptly and his elaborate and surreal Taoist funeral pitches the family into a battle where the stakes are the very meaning of life itself.
Singapore Dreaming is a poignant yet darkly humorous story which follows the lives of six individuals as they navigate the rapidly changing conditions experienced in today’s modern South- East Asian cities.  

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